2009 National Planning Excellence, Leadership and Achievement Awards

Deadline for most awards: September 10, 2008

Each year, the American Planning Association honors outstanding
efforts in planning and planning leadership, including cutting-edge
achievements and planning under difficult or adverse circumstances. We
invite you to participate in the celebration of the best in plans and
planning by nominating projects and people you think deserving of such
recognition.

Nominations for 2009 National Planning Awards will be accepted here starting July 1, 2008.

September 10, 2008, at 12 midnight (local time) is the deadline for
submitting online nominations for National Planning Excellence,
National Planning Leadership, and National Planning Achievement awards;
the International Planning Leadership Award; APA President’s Award;
AICP President’s Award; AICP National Planning Pioneer Award; and APA
Distinguished Service and Contribution Awards.

If you have questions about any of the National Planning Excellence,
Leadership, and Achievement Awards, contact APA Public Affairs
Coordinator Denny Johnson at djohnson@planning.org or 202-349-1006.

For additional information about APA Journalism, AICP Student
Project Awards, and AICP Outstanding Student Awards, see descriptions
below.

Award Categories and Submission Information

Daniel Burnham Award for a Comprehensive Plan

National Planning Excellence Awards

National Planning Excellence Award for Best Practice
National Planning Excellence Award for a Grassroots Initiative
National Planning Excellence Award for Implementation
The Public Outreach Award
National Excellence Award for Innovation in Regional Planning
National Planning Landmark Award

National Planning Leadership Awards

The AICP National Planning Leadership Award for a Professional Planner
The National Planning Leadership Award for a Planning Advocate
The National Planning Leadership Award for a Student Planner
APA President’s Award for Meritorious Service
AICP President’s Award for Exceptional Practice

The International Planning Leadership Award

The HUD Secretary’s Opportunity and Empowerment Award

National Planning Achievement Awards

National Planning Achievement Award for a Hard-Won Victory
Paul Davidoff National Award for Social Change and Diversity
Diana Donald National Award for Issues of Importance to Women and Families

Other APA and AICP Awards

The Distinguished Service Award
The Distinguished Contribution Award
AICP National Planning Pioneer Award
AICP Student Project Award
AICP
Outstanding Student Award

APA Journalism Awards

Additional Eligibility Criteria

General Submission Information

Judging and Awards Ceremony

Daniel Burnham Award for a Comprehensive Plan

For a comprehensive or general plan that advances the science and
art of planning. The award honors America’s most famous planner, Daniel
Burnham, for his contributions to the planning profession and to a
greater awareness of the benefits of good planning for all communities.
The award is given for group achievement and may be made to a planning
agency, planning team or firm, community group, or local authority.
There are no restrictions on the size of jurisdiction. 

Eligibility
Open to APA members and non-members.

Criteria

Originality and innovation. Document how
your entry presents a visionary approach or innovative concept in
addressing the needs of the community or jurisdiction covered by the
plan. What innovative practices or measures were used to develop the
plan? For example, is there originality in the way new data were
collected and incorporated into the plan? Explain how the use of the
planning process in this context broadened accepted planning principles
within the context of the local situation.

Transferability.
Illustrate how the nominated comprehensive plan has potential
application for others and how use of your entry’s components and
methodology would further the cause of good planning.

Quality.
What makes this plan worthy of emulation by others? How does the plan
incorporate principles of smart growth and sustainability? Competitive
entries will represent excellence of thought, analysis, writing, and
graphics throughout the plan, regardless of budgetary
limitations. Indicate how available resources were used in a thoughtful
and ethical process. 

Content and plan elements.
How complete is the plan? What different elements does the plan contain
and in what ways does the plan support or connect to other plans or
planning mandates, such as hazard mitigation planning; protection of
biodiversity, including threatened or endangered species; and
sustainable use of natural resources for the area? Specify how planning
principles have been observed, especially in consideration of your
entry’s effects on other public objectives.

Public participation. Explain
how various public interests were involved and the extent of that
involvement. Competitive entries need to demonstrate a strong effort to
solicit input from those who historically have been left out of the
planning process. Show how the nominated plan obtained public and
private support.

Role of planners. 
Clarify the role, significance, and participation of  planners; for
instance, how in-house staff and consultants worked
together. Demonstrate the connection between the success of this effort
and increased awareness in the community of planners and the planning
process.

Implementation strategy. How
much local political support is there for the plan and its
implementation? Is there a separate implementation strategy and, if so,
what does it include? What preliminary steps have been taken to help
build momentum and public support for following and implementing the
plan?

Effectiveness and results.
What impact has the planning process or plan or both had on how the
community responds to and manages change? Be specific about the plan’s
impact. For example, what new policies or directions have resulted
because of the plan or the planning process used for the plan? What is
the level of commitment by elected officials, business and community
leaders, citizen groups, and others to follow and implement the plan?

National Planning Excellence Awards

The following six awards recognize group achievement by a planning
agency, planning team or firm, community group, or local authority in
helping civic leaders and citizens play a meaningful role in creating
communities that enrich people’s lives. There are no restrictions on
the size of jurisdiction.

Criteria (for Best Practice, Grassroots Initiative, and Implementation categories)

Each nomination must address all of the following areas completely in addition to the specific requirements (if any) listed for each category:

Originality and innovation. Document how
your entry presents a visionary approach or innovative concept to
address needs. Explain how the use of the planning process in this
context broadened accepted planning principles within the context of
the situation.

Transferability.
Illustrate how the entry has potential application for others and how
application of your entry’s components and methodology would further
the cause of good planning.

Quality.
Winning entries will represent excellence of thought, analysis,
writing, and graphics throughout the nomination, regardless of
budgetary limitations. Indicate how available resources were used.

Comprehensiveness.
Specify how planning principles have been observed, especially in
consideration of your entry’s effects on other public objectives.
Identify to what extent your entry includes elements important to the
local community and affecting not only the built environment, but also
the community’s natural resources, conservation areas, and wildlife
species, and planning elements addressing economic or social arenas or
both.

Public participation. Explain
the level of public participation in this effort. The winning entries
demonstrate a strong effort to solicit input from those who
historically have been left out of the planning process. Show how the
entries obtained public and private support.

Role of planners.
Clarify the role, significance, and participation of the planner; for
instance, how in-house staff and consultants worked together.
Demonstrate the connection between the success of this effort and
increased awareness of planners and the planning process.

Effectiveness and results.
State how your entry addressed the need or problem that prompted its
initiation. Be explicit about how the results have made a difference in
the lives of the people affected. Convey the level of effectiveness
your entry can have over time.

National Planning Excellence Award for Best Practices

For a specific planning tool, practice, program, project, or process
that is a significant advancement to specific elements of planning.
This category emphasizes results and demonstrates how innovative and
state-of-the-art planning methods and practices helped to implement a
plan. Entries may include such things as regulations and codes, tax
policies or initiatives, growth management or design guidelines,
transferable development rights programs, land acquisition efforts,
public/private partnerships, applications of technology, handbooks, or
efforts that foster greater participation in community planning.

Eligibility
Open to APA members and non-members.

National Planning Excellence Award for a Grassroots Initiative

For an initiative that illustrates how a community utilized the
planning process to address a need that extends beyond the traditional
scope of planning. Emphasis is placed on the success of planning in new
or different settings. Winning projects will expand public
understanding of the planning process. This could include such efforts
as community policing or drug prevention, neighborhood outreach
initiatives, programs designed for special populations, public art or
cultural efforts, community festivals, environmental or conservation
initiatives, summer recreational initiatives for children, or focused
tourism ventures.

Eligibility
Open to APA members and non-members.

Additonal Criteria, Grassroots Initiative category

Education. Establish that
your entry has encouraged community leaders to revise their opinions
about the varied uses and broad applications of the planning process.
State the influence your entry has had on public awareness beyond those
immediately affected.

Collaboration.
Describe the level of collaboration between leadership and competing
interests. Explain how those affected were brought into the planning
process for this initiative.

National Planning Excellence Award for Implementation

For an effort that demonstrates a significant achievement for an
area, either a single community or a region, in accomplishing positive
changes as a result of planning. This category emphasizes long-term,
measurable results to demonstrate that sustained implementation makes a
difference. Nominated efforts should have been in continuous effect for
a minimum of five years. Nominations can include, but are not limited
to, plans for smart growth, signage, farmland preservation, urban
design, wetland mitigation, resource conservation, capital
improvements, citizen participation, neighborhood improvement,
transportation management, and sustained economic development.

Eligibility
Open to APA members and non-members.

Additional Criteria, Implementation category

Sustained improvement. Indicate the
level of consistency of this implementation effort since its start.
Detail any changes, derailments, or improvements throughout the
implementation phase.

Funding.
Identify funding challenges or support for this effort. Report any
political changes that might affect, for better or worse, the effort’s
long-term funding.

Community acceptance and support. Describe how
the longevity of this effort has increased the community’s appetite for
planning and the pursuit of similar initiatives. Clarify the extent
that this effort’s sustained success has been achieved beyond its
general audience.

Environmental planning and impacts. How
has the nominated effort identified, evaluated, and addressed potential
beneficial and adverse consequences of implementing a project,
development, or program on the surrounding environment including its
flora and fauna? In situations where adverse environmental impacts were
unavoidable, what mitigation measures were undertaken and how effective
have they been?

The Public Outreach Award

For an individual, project, or program that uses information and
education about the value of planning and how planning improves a
community’s quality of life to create greater awareness among citizens
or specific segments of the public. This may include, but is not
limited to, broad community efforts showing how planning can make a
difference, curricula designed to teach children about planning,
neighborhood empowerment programs, initiatives designed to include new
individuals and groups in the planning process, use of technology to
expand public participation in planning, outreach programs to the
media, or comprehensive campaigns to renew or initiate a plan.

Eligibility
Open to APA members and non-members.

Criteria

Originality. Document how
the program uses new ideas or combines tools to address a demonstrated
need for planning information or education within the community.

Quality. Entries
need to demonstrate excellence of thought, analysis, writing, and
graphics throughout the nomination, regardless of budgetary
limitations. Indicate how available resources were used in a thoughtful
and ethical process.

Education. Show
how the program has increased the understanding of planning principles
and the planning process. Explain how the results have been measured
and internalized.

Transferability. Illustrate
how the entry has potential application for others. Describe how
widespread application would be in the interest of the planning
profession.

Effectiveness and results. Specify
the extent that the program, if directed to adults or designed as a
general education effort, has been effective in implementing plans and
ideas. Show how the program has furthered the cause of sound planning.
Provide measurable results if possible or appropriate (for example,
pre- and post-outreach effort poll results).

National Excellence Award for Innovation in Regional Planning

Many of today’s most pressing issues cannot be addressed within
local jurisdictions alone. Environmental conservation, disaster
mitigation, economic strategies, transportation and demographic shifts
all require regional thinking and regional solutions. Planners
attention is being focused on metropolitan regions, “mega-regions,” and
other spatial delineations that span beyond state and even national
boundaries.

APA seeks to identify the leading regional planning practices to
promote and strengthen support for regional planning at all levels.
This award category is part of APA’s larger effort to call attention to
the need for regional planning and to promote national and state
policies providing legal and financial incentives for community
cooperation.

Planning for regions involves a broad spectrum of issues affecting
how places are planned and 0designed as well as management and
communications systems that link our complex public and private
institutions. Among the principal areas of regional concern are urban
agricultural, air and water quality, climate change, energy use and
efficiency, green infrastructure, resource conservation, biodiversity
protection, transportation choices and impacts, compact development,
and sustainability.

For 2009, the American Planning Association’s national awards
program seeks examples of innovative plans, programs, tools, or related
efforts that demonstrate advancement in planners’ efforts to address
the issues of planning at a regional, multi-jurisdictional level.

Eligibility
Open to APA members and non-members.

Criteria

Planning and innovation.
Regional plans and planning should both address a wide range of issues
and also meet specific needs. What critical regional planning elements
are addressed by the nominated effort in terms of lessening and
mitigating adverse impacts from development and everyday living? How
are energy conservation measures and incentives to use energy-efficient
or energy-saving technologies incorporated into the plan? Is the
practice of urban agriculture encouraged and integrated into a
community’s economic and ecological systems? What provisions are
included to ensure restoration and protection of threatened and
endangered species, their habitat, and other critical natural
resources, including air and water? What other ways does the plan or
planning effort seek to create a community that is truly sustainable
and compatible with the natural resources and environmental systems
upon which its existence depends? How are density, and the
encouragement and site selection for density, promoted?

Plan compatibility.
How is regional planning integrated with corresponding comprehensive or
master plans, district or special-use plans, recreational plans,
economic development plans, capital improvement programs, zoning
ordinances, or other related initiatives? In what ways does the
regional planning effort support the broader needs of the community and
surrounding area or address community-wide objectives?

Citizen participation.
What was done to ensure the widest variety of resident and stakeholder
participation in the plan and planning process? What steps were taken
to inform affected residents and ensure collaboration with
decision-makers, service providers, and business leaders during the
planning process? How is the plan continuing to further discussion and
implementation? What innovative ways are people able to use the plan to
inform individual decisions and to become educated on the regional
aspects that affect them?

Collaboration and partnerships.
What strategic partnerships or alliances were developed to help meet
the goals and objectives of the nominated effort? What formal and
informal steps were taken to engage community leaders and local
officials so as to gain broad public support for the plan and its
implementation, and effectively address home-rule,
inter-jurisdictional, or related governing and political issues?

Social and economic concerns.
How does the nominated effort address not only a community’s physical
realm, but also its social and economic concerns and issues? For
example, linking the food system in a region to local neighborhood
markets and institutions, or addressing the issues of environmental
justice. The nomination should demonstrate ways to offer more housing
choices, job creation and transportation options across the spectrum of
communities in the region.

National Planning Landmark Award

The National Planning Landmark Award is for a planning project,
initiative, or endeavor that is historically significant and that may
be used or accessed by the public.

Eligibility
Open to APA members and non-members.

Criteria

Historical significance. What
is the nomination’s historical significance in terms of at least one of
the following: being a pioneering work or a documented first; being
historically significant, unique, and outstanding; having initiated a
new direction in planning that had a lasting effect or other impact; or
having impact on American planning, cities, or regions during a broad
range of time, space, or both time and space? Nominated landmarks must
date back at least 25 years from the September 10, 2008, nomination
deadline (September 10, 1983, or before).

National significance.
What effect or impact did the nominated landmark have on planning in
the United States as a whole? What is the nominated landmark’s national
importance and influence in helping create communities or other places
of lasting value throughout the country?

Persons involved:
Who were the significant planners or others who were involved and
responsible for the accomplishments of the nominated landmark?

National Planning Leadership Awards

The following awards are given to individuals for outstanding,
significant, and sustained contributions to, and in support of,
planning and the planning profession.

The AICP National Planning Leadership Award for a Professional Planner

Recognizes a sustained contribution to the profession through distinguished practice, teaching, or writing.

Eligibility
Nominated individuals may not enter themselves and must be employed
within the practice of planning, whether in the public, for-profit, or
nonprofit sector. AICP membership is required.

Criteria

Support of planning and planners.
Illustrate how the nominee’s work has increased the understanding of
the planning process. Indicate how the nominee has shown a clear
understanding of, and support for, the role of planners in public life.

Effectiveness and results. Describe
the extent that the nominee has been effective in formulating and
implementing plans and ideas in support of good planning. Identify the
level of influence and effectiveness achieved by the nominee within
different segments of the community.

The National Planning Leadership Award for a Planning Advocate

Recognizes an individual, appointed official, or an elected official
who has advanced or promoted the cause of planning in the public arena.
Those nominated may include engaged citizens demonstrating outstanding
leadership in a community, region, or state; members of planning
commissions, boards of zoning appeals, economic development boards,
environmental or historic preservation councils, or other appointed
officials; or elected officials, whether holding office at the local,
regional, or state level. Nominations may also include the more
nontraditional roles of citizen activists or neighborhood leaders.

Eligibility
Candidates cannot be self-nominated and cannot earn their living as planners. APA membership is not required.

Criteria

Support of planning and planners.
Illustrate how the nominee’s work has increased the understanding of
the planning process. Indicate how the nominee has shown a clear
understanding of, and support for, the role of planners in public life.

Effectiveness and results. Describe
the extent that the nominee has been effective in formulating and
implementing plans and ideas in support of good planning. Identify the
level of influence and effectiveness achieved by the nominee within
different segments of the community.

The National Planning Leadership Award for a Student Planner (graduate and undergraduate levels)

Recognizes up to two students in the final year of a Planning
Accreditation Board–approved planning program, one at the undergraduate
level and one at the graduate level, for outstanding achievement during
the nominee’s academic career in planning.

Eligibility
One nomination will be accepted from each accredited planning program
at the undergraduate and graduate levels. APA membership is required.

Criteria

Support of planning.
Illustrate how the nominee’s academic achievement has demonstrated
comprehension of planning principles and the planning process. Show how
the nominee’s participation and leadership within the planning program
demonstrated a sincere enthusiasm for excellence in planning.

Effectiveness, results, and potential. Describe
the contribution the nominee has made to the planning profession.
Explain how the nominee demonstrates potential for success as a
professional planner.

APA President’s Award for Meritorious Service

Given once during an APA President’s term for remarkable achievement
by a
member of the American Planning Association in service to the
organization. Nominations for this award are being accepted for the
April 2008 awards ceremony.

Eligibility
Persons nominated must be members of APA. Self-nominations are not accepted.

Criterion

Remarkable achievements.
Specify how the nominee’s contributions to APA stand out and
merit recognition by the president of APA. Please be specific when
describing the nominee’s contributions.

AICP President’s Award for Exceptional Practice

This award, given by the AICP President, recognizes exceptional
practice by an individual professional planner, a group of planners, or a planning
program that has demonstrated a significant contribution to advancing the planning
profession.

Eligibility
Individuals nominated for this award must be members of the American
Institute of Certified Planners. Self-nominations are not accepted.

Criteria

Exceptional practice. Specify how the nominee’s work stands out and demonstrates exceptional practice.

Significant contributions. Detail the nominee’s contributions that have helped advance the practice of planning and the planning profession.

The International Planning Leadership Award

Given increasing globalization, planners must often expand their
vision to encompass not just domestic but international concerns.
Issues can include social equality and livable communities, as well as
environmental and ecological issues. Planners today must maintain a
global awareness and seek insights beyond traditional country borders.
To encourage such innovation and elevate planning issues globally, the
American Planning Association has established the International
Planning Leadership Award.

Eligibility: Candidates cannot be self-nominated. APA membership is not required.

Criteria

Support of planning and planners.
Illustrate how the nominee’s work has increased the understanding of
the planning process. Indicate how the nominee has shown a clear
understanding of, and support for, the role of planning and planners in
public life.

Effectiveness and results. Describe
the extent that the nominee has been effective in formulating,
advocating for, and implementing plans and ideas in support of good
planning. Identify the level of influence and effectiveness achieved by
the nominee at the national level of their home country, and
internationally, if applicable.

The HUD Secretary’s Opportunity and Empowerment Award

Given in partnership with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

A single award will be made for a plan, program, or project that, as
a direct result of the effort, demonstrates improved quality of life
for low- and moderate-income community residents. Emphasis is on how
creative housing, economic development, and private investments have
been used in or with a comprehensive community development plan.

This award emphasizes tangible results and recognizes the planning
discipline and its skills as a community strategy. Nominees should show
how they have overcome difficult community issues. Examples of eligible
submissions include regulatory reform, growth management,
transportation, community participation, diverse housing planning, and
economic development. The strategy should employ a variety of actions
that maximize increased choice and opportunity.

To the maximum extent possible, submissions should involve formal
community planning efforts and include physical improvements or
interventions (though the latter is not required). The strategy
submitted should have been in effect a minimum of three years.

Eligibility
Open to APA members and non-members.

Criteria

Planning. How did the
submission relate to existing plans (comprehensive, regional, and
neighborhood)? What role did planners play in achieving the results?
How was the planning process important to subsequent implementation?
Finally, how involved in the plan were specific groups and individuals
from private, nonprofit, and public perspectives, particularly those
who may have been left out of similar efforts in the past?

Results. To
what extent has the submission addressed and documented the need for
increased economic employment, education, or housing choice or mobility
among low- and moderate-income residents in a cost-effective and
quality manner? Include the end date, detailed cost and funding data,
and when the results were implemented. Information must be included
describing how the nominated effort has exceeded any minimum
requirements imposed by the source or sources of grants, loans, or
other funding, whether government or private, obtained and used by the
program, project, or effort.

Innovation. To
what extent does the submission use innovative approaches in planning
to address community needs? How is it innovative for the locality and
innovative nationally for a given field or program or practice? For
projects using HOPE VI funds, describe how the nomination builds on
existing HOPE VI requirements.

Transferability.
How, and to what extent, does the submission provide an example for
others? What indicates that the approach can be applied elsewhere?
Describe how the project uniquely addressed and overcame challenges
that are common to contemporary projects and today’s constraints and
challenges.

National Planning Achievement Awards

National Planning Achievement Award for a Hard-Won Victory

For a planning initiative or other planning effort undertaken by a
community, neighborhood, citizens group, or jurisdiction in the face of
difficult or trying circumstances. This award recognizes the positive
effect of hard-won victories by professional planners, citizen
planners, or both working under difficult, challenging, or adverse
conditions because of natural disasters, local circumstances, financial
or organizational constraints, social factors, or other causes.

Eligibility
Open to APA members and non-members.

Criteria

Challenges or barriers.
What obstacles, whether physical, natural, political, social, or a
combination thereof, were faced and addressed by the nominated effort?
What is the extent of these challenges or other adversarial conditions,
and what steps were undertaken to meet the difficult circumstances?

Available resources.
What resources were available and how were these resources (financial,
personnel, consultants, etc.) managed, leveraged, and deployed?

Progress and positive effects.
What are the lasting effects the effort has had or is likely to have on
planning in the community? Has the effort removed or mitigated the
barriers and obstacles? How has or will the effort shape the future in
the community or locale? What influence has the nominated effort had on
community leaders and their views about the value and effectiveness of
planning?

Paul Davidoff National Award for Social Change and Diversity

This award honors a project, group, or individual demonstrating a
sustained social commitment to advocacy involving planning for the
needs of society’s less fortunate members, or for efforts or specific
projects by individuals belonging to a minority group or organizations
whose membership, staff, or focus is on minority concerns and such
individuals or organizations have successfully promoted and helped
expand diversity within the planning profession or have promoted and
helped expand planning and diversity. The award honors the late APA
member for his contributions to the planning field.

Eligibility
Open to APA members and non-members.

Criteria

Advocacy. Describe to what
extent the nominee addressed the needs of those that society typically
overlooks during the planning process.

Effectiveness. Specify how
the nominee’s effort has had an impact on the lives of those the
nominee is working to help. Indicate how those efforts have touched a
wider audience.

Diversity. For
nominations addressing diversity issues and concerns, what has the
individual, organization, or undertaken effort done to promote
diversity within the planning profession or to advance and sustain
sound, ethical, and inclusionary planning in communities, regions,
states, or the nation?

Diana Donald National Award for Issues of Importance to Women and Families

For a significant contribution to planning issues related to women
and the family. This award is named after past APA Director Diana
Donald in recognition of her contributions to the organization.

Eligibility
Open to APA members and non-members. Candidates may not nominate themselves.

Criteria

Support of women and the family.
Describe how the nominee’s efforts addressed the concerns of women
through specific actions or contributions to planning initiatives in
the community.

Effectiveness.
Specify how the nominee’s effort has been effective in furthering the
cause of women’s issues through planning. Indicate how those efforts
have touched a wider audience.

Other APA and AICP Awards

The Distinguished Service Award

Recognizing an APA member who has contributed to the development and
mission of the American Planning Association in a substantial manner
over a sustained period.

Eligibility
Any APA member other than the person nominated may submit a member’s name for this award.

The Distinguished Contribution Award

Recognizing an APA member who has contributed to the goals and
objectives of the American Planning Association and to its development
plan through an extraordinary effort over a short period of time.

Eligibility
Any APA member other than the person nominated may submit a member’s name for this award.

Criteria for both Distinguished Service and Contribution Awards

Support of Planning. Specify how the nominee’s work increased the understanding of planning principles and the planning process.

Support of APA. Detail how the nominee’s participation in, and contribution to, APA furthered the cause of the association.

Effectiveness. Describe
the level of effectiveness the nominee has had in formulating and
implementing his or her ideas, subsequently furthering the cause of
planning and APA.

AICP National Planning Pioneer Award

Deadline for entries: September 10, 2008

The Planning Pioneer Awards are presented to pioneers of the
profession who have made personal and direct innovations in American
planning that have significantly and positively redirected planning
practice, education, or theory with long-term results. Contributions
must date back at least 25 years from the September 10, 2008,
nomination deadline (September 10, 1983, or before).

Eligibility
Any APA member other than the person nominated may submit a member’s name for this award.

Criteria

Historic impact on planning.
Describe the nominated person’s personal and direct innovations or new
models that directly influenced the future of American planning and
explain how these developments significantly and positively redirected
planning practice, education, theory, or organization. Show and
document long-term, historically significant results in terms of
planning practice, planning theory, planning literature, citizen
participation, or a combination of these subject areas.

National significance.
What have been the national impacts or effects of the of the nominated
person’s planning contributions? Describe, including specific examples
or developments.

AICP Student Project Awards

Deadline for nominations: December 9, 2008

These awards recognize outstanding class projects or papers by a
student or group of students in Planning Accreditation Board-accredited
planning programs that contribute to advances in the field of planning.
Awards may be given in up to three categories:

  1. the project that best demonstrates the contribution of planning to contemporary issues
  2. the project best applying the planning process
  3. applied research

Winning entries will be recognized at the 2009 APA/AICP Annual
Meeting and Awards Ceremony held during the 2009 National Planning
Conference April 25-29, 2009, in Minneapolis. Entries may be submitted
online through the APA website starting July 1, 2008.  

Deadline for nominations: 12 midnight (local time) Tuesday, December 9, 2008. Click here for more details.

AICP Outstanding Student Awards

Submission window: March 2 – May 5, 2009

The purpose of the award is to recognize outstanding attainment in
the study of planning by students graduating from Planning
Accreditation Board–accredited planning programs (one at the
undergraduate level and one at the graduate level, if applicable)
during the academic year of the award. Each respective planning
program:

  1. determines its own criteria, which may include but is not
    limited to, academic achievement, leadership, commitment to planning as
    a career, and community service
  2. convenes a jury to make the selection(s)
  3. schedules the award presentation(s) at their respective school(s)

Period for submitting online nominations: March 2, 2009, and 12 midnight (local time) May 5, 2009. Click here for more details.

APA Journalism Awards

Deadline for entries: January 15, 2009, for articles published in 2008

APA’s annual Journalism Awards honors newspapers “for public service
rendered in the advancement of city and regional planning through
outstanding journalism.” A newspaper in each of three classes may be
selected for an award: circulation below 50,000, circulation of 50,000
to 100,000, and circulation above 100,000.

Articles published in 2008 must be received by APA at 122 S.
Michigan Avenue, Suite 1600, Chicago, IL 60603-6107 by the close of
business January 15, 2009. Online entries are not accepted for this award category.

The nomination form will be available here later in the year

Contact Sylvia Lewis at 312-786-6370 or slewis@planning.org for additional information.

Additional Eligibility Criteria

With the noted exception of the National Planning
Excellence Award for Implementation, the National Planning Landmark
Award, and the AICP National Planning Pioneer Award, any plan, project,
program, tool, process, report, or ordinance entered must have been
published, implemented or completed within three years of the date of
submission.

Nominators must assign each submission to one category. No changes
will be allowed after the submission deadline. The jury may move a
submission from one category to another.

Recipients of the APA President’s Meritorious Service Award, AICP
President’s Award, or Distinguished Service, Distinguished
Contribution, any of the National Planning Leadership, the
International Leadership, Paul Davidoff, and Diana Donald awards are
ineligible to receive the same award for 10 years after accepting it.

Nominators may not be related by blood or marriage to any individual
they wish to nominate for a APA President’s Meritorious Service Award,
AICP President’s Award, or the Distinguished Service, Distinguished
Contribution, Public Outreach, any of the National Planning Leadership,
the International Planning Leadership, Paul Davidoff, or Diana Donald
awards.

Members of the APA Awards Committee, APA staff, APA Board of
Directors, and AICP Commission are not eligible to enter, to be
nominated, or to receive individual awards. These individuals may not
attempt to influence or affect the outcome of the jury process for any
nominated project, plan, or individual.

General Submission
Information

General Submission Information

Submission deadline for the National Planning Awards is September 10, 2008.
Please note that the APA Journalism Awards, the AICP Student Project Awards,
and the AICP Outstanding Student Awards have different submission processes
and deadlines, which are described above.

  • All basic nomination materials for ALL award categories except the APA
    Journalism Awards must be submitted through the APA website at www.planning.org/awards/2009.htm.
    Online nomination forms will be available starting July 1, 2008. Basic nomination
    materials vary according to each respective award category, but for APA’s
    National Planning Excellence, Leadership, and Achievement Award categories
    items include an application form, one-page summary of the entry, two-page
    narration of how the entry meets the award criteria, up to five letters of
    support, digital images, and entry fee, if applicable.  

  • Entries must include a two-page explanation that specifically answers the
    criteria in the order requested under each category. Use the award criteria
    stated in this document to reference specific examples that illustrate your
    points.

  • Nominators for the National Planning Excellence Award for Implementation
    are advised that this category emphasizes action and results. Supporting
    documentation should take the form of reviews of the implementation effort,
    analysis of the results, newspaper clippings, editorials, etc.
  • At least one, but no more than five, one-page letter(s) in support of the
    entry. The letter(s) should offer support for the value of the nominated
    effort and may not be written by the nominator of the submission, by the
    nominated individual or by anyone who directly worked on the project. Comments
    from appropriate APA chapters, divisions, members, and other stakeholders
    involved with the subject of the nomination are encouraged.
  • Nominations for all of the National Planning Award
    categories (Daniel Burnham, Planning Excellence, Planning Landmark,
    Planning Leadership, Planning Achievement, Paul Davidoff, Diana Donald,
    and AICP National Planning Pioneer), as well as the HUD Secretary’s Award and the International Planning Leadership Award, must include
    no more than 10 digital, copyright-free images (.jpg format) with photo captions
    that provide context and show the award nomination’s positive results or
    intended results. Images should supplement, not restate, what exists in the
    submission package. For award categories involving an individual person,
    include at least one recent picture of the individual and five additional
    copyright-free photos with captions (.jpg format) that are representative
    or illustrative of the person’s most significant professional work or endeavors.
    Pictures taken of the nominee while on personal leave, vacation, or in non-work-related
    settings should not be included. Each submitted image should not be more
    than 600 kilobytes (KB) in size. Please provide a photo caption that is
    between 15 and 25 words in length for each image. Photo collages and PowerPoint
    presentations ARE NOT acceptable. Please submit only digital
    images that are not copyrighted and may be reproduced by APA without a fee,
    charge, or copyright infringement.
  • A fee applies to each award category EXCEPT the
    HUD Secretary’s Opportunity and Empowerment Award, the AICP National
    Planning Pioneer Award, the AICP Student Project Awards, the AICP
    Outstanding Student Awards, the APA President’s Award for Meritorious
    Service, the AICP President’s Award for Exceptional Practice, The
    International Planning Leadership Award, and the APA Journalism Awards.
    These award categories do not have fees.

  • The applicable entry fee for APA members is $60 per nomination; for non-members
    the fee is $100 per nomination. Fees must be paid by credit card (Visa, MasterCard,
    American Express) online via the APA website. Cash payments are not accepted.

  • The awards committee’s procedures prohibit any communication with jurors
    on behalf of an entry. Such communication is reason for disqualification.
  • Entries receiving awards become the property of APA and will not be returned.

Should you have questions about the 2009 award categories or award criteria,
contact Denny Johnson at APA’s Public Affairs Office at djohnson@planning.org or
202-349-1006.

Judging and Awards Ceremony

Judging for National Planning Awards will take place through a
two-part process during the fall of 2008. Jurors are under no
obligation to grant an award in any category and may select to move a
nomination to a different category. Nominators of submissions will be
notified confidentially in December 2008, if not sooner. Official
announcements of submissions receiving awards will be made after all
nominators have been notified.

Presentations will be made at the National Planning Conference in
Minneapolis, April 25-29, 2009. Recipients of APA National Planning
Excellence, Leadership, and Achievement Awards, the Daniel Burnham
Award, the National Landmark Award, and the HUD Secretary’s Award, and
the International Planning Leadership Award receive a personalized
award sculpture and certificate, and are featured in a Spring 2009
edition of Planning magazine and on APA’s website.

This information pulled from http://www.planning.org/awards/2009.htm

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